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Non-contact Infrared Thermometers

NCITs may be used to reduce cross-contamination risk and minimize the risk of spreading disease. While typically 98.6°F (37.0°C) is considered a “normal” temperature, some studies have shown that “normal” body temperature can be within a wide range, from 97°F (36.1°C) to 99°F (37.2°C). Before NCITs are used, it is important to understand the benefits, limitations, and proper use of these thermometers. Improper use of NCITs may lead to inaccurate measurements of temperature.”

Visit fda.gov for more information on non-contact infrared thermometers

Figure 1: Correct Use – Forehead unobstructed, and NCIT perpendicular to forehead and used at distance identified in manufacturer’s instructions.

Figure 2: Incorrect Use – Not perpendicular to forehead

Figure 3: Incorrect Use – Forehead exposed to direct sunlight outdoors

References
Note, this information is applicable to NCITs which are intended for a medical purpose which means that the NCIT is intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or in the cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease and, therefore, meets the definition of “device” set forth in Section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

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Q&A for Consumers: Hand Sanitizers and COVID-19

The FDA is working with U.S. government partners including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), medical product manufacturers, and international partners to address the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak.

Find the most recent FDA updates on the Coronavirus Disease 2019 page.

Q. Is hand sanitizer effective against COVID-19?

A:  The best way to prevent the spread of infections and decrease the risk of getting sick is by washing your hands with plain soap and water, advises the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds is essential, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing, or blowing one’s nose. If soap and water are not available, CDC recommends consumers use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

            View CDC Handwashing Recommendations at cdc.gov/handwashing/

Q. Should I be using antibacterial soap to wash my hands?

A: The best way to prevent the spread of infections and decrease the risk of getting sick is by washing your hands with plain soap and water, advises the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds is essential, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing, or blowing one’s nose. There is currently no evidence that consumer antiseptic wash products (also known as antibacterial soaps) are any more effective at preventing illness than washing with plain soap and water. In fact, some data suggests that antibacterial ingredients could do more harm than good in the long-term and more research is needed.

For additional information, see Topical Antiseptic Products: Hand Sanitizers and Antibacterial Soaps.

Q. Many surface cleaners and disinfectants say they can be used against SARS-CoV-2. What does this mean? Can I use these products on my hands or body to prevent or treat the virus?

A:  Always follow the instructions on household cleaners. Do not use disinfectant sprays or wipes on your skin because they may cause skin and eye irritation. Disinfectant sprays or wipes are not intended for use on humans or animals. Disinfectant sprays or wipes are intended for use on hard, non-porous surfaces.

View the current list of products that meet EPA’s criteria for use against SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19.

Q. Where should hand sanitizer be stored?

A:   Hand sanitizer should be stored out of reach, and sight, of children. It should not be stored above 105°F (for example, it should not be stored in a car during the summer months).

Visit fda.gov/ to read more Q&A’s for Consumers: Hand Sanitizers and COVID-19

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Updated Interim Enforcement Response Plan for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

“This Updated Interim Enforcement Response Plan for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) provides instructions and guidance to Area Offices and compliance safety and health officers (CSHOs) for handling COVID-19-related complaints, referrals, and severe illness reports. On May 26, 2020, the previous memorandum on this topic[1] will be rescinded, and this new Updated Interim Enforcement Response Plan will go into and remain in effect until further notice. This guidance is intended to be time-limited to the current COVID-19 public health crisis. Please frequently check OSHA’s webpage at www.osha.gov/coronavirus for updates.”

Attachments from the Updated Interim Enforcement Response Plan:

  • Specific enforcement procedures (Attachment 1)
  • A sample employer letter for COVID-19 activities (Attachment 2)
  • A sample hazard alert letter (Attachment 3)
  • A sample alleged violation description for a citation under the general duty clause, Section 5(a)(1), of the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act (Attachment 4)
  • Additional references, including OSHA’s prior COVID-19-related enforcement memoranda (Attachment 5)
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When to wear gloves

“For the general public, CDC recommends wearing gloves when you are cleaning or caring for someone who is sick.”

In most other situations, like running errands, wearing gloves is not necessary. Instead, practice everyday preventive actions like keeping social distance (at least 6 feet) from others, washing your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds (or using a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol), and wearing a cloth face covering when you have to go out in public.”